Category: Buyer (2)

Quit Claim Deeds

Quit Claim Deeds

 

A lot of people that own land or Lots typically transfer ownership via a Quit Claim Deed. Which if done correctly is not a problem at all. However with the internet making form so readily available I am seeing more and more deeds that are completed incorrectly or not filed.

In the last 2 months I have run into these type problems in several forms. One person use commas (,) in the legal description of land instead of the word “of”  i.e. Northwest ¼ of the Northwest ¼ –NOT—Northwest 1/4,Northwest 1/4 . Another common mistake is the use of the owners names John Doe and Jane Doe need to have a further description behind the names. i.e. John Doe and Jane Doe Husband and Wife or John Doe and Jane Doe single persons.

Another common problem we have been seeing is a tract of land being deeded off to someone else after a bankruptcy of divorce has been filed. I don’t think these were done to hide anything from the bankruptcy or divorcing spouses at least not in the case of the one I have run into lately. But if the Quit Claim Deed transfer takes after the date of the bankruptcy or divorce filing it now has a cloud on the tile. In the case of a bankruptcy the bankruptcy will have to be reopened and the property dealt with. In the case of t a divorce the ex-spouse will have to sign a new quit claim deed.

And the final problem is someone give you a quit claim deed and you do not file it at the county court house in the county the land is located in you may or may not have legal ownership, I will leave that to the attorney’s.

The bottom line is have an attorney or title company review it for you and check to make sure no leans have been levied on the property before you take ownership. The small fee they would charge you will save you a big headache and possible legal fees in the future.

 

Home Buyer Viewing Code of Etiquette

In today’s world of high security, video cameras, nanny cameras and audio monitors, it is becoming common for sellers to not only monitor who is in their home and when they were there, but also listen to every word that is said by a potential buyer.

For these reasons, we have created a “Viewing Code of Etiquette” that we would encourage our buyers to consider when they are in another person’s home whether a home is being monitored or not.

  • Buyers are there as guests – Although the seller’s goal is to sell their home, buyers should give the same respect that they would want when people were in their home.
  • Respect the property – Buyers should refrain from opening dresser drawers in any bedroom and should they need to use the restroom, always flush and clean up.
  • Control the kids – We love children, but children need to be supervised and need to stay with the group and not wonder off. Playing with toys that belong to the kids of the seller should be left in place and not played with.
  • Don’t make negative comments about the home – Comments about the furniture, the family pictures, or the homeowner’s choice of paint color should be made after you’ve left the house. Negative comments can be taken personally and might estrange negotiations.
  • Don’t rave about how perfect the house is – You can negate much of your negotiating strength if the sell knows that the house is exactly what you’re looking for and you could easily end up paying too much for the property.
  • LEAVE A CARD! – People like to know if someone has been in their home.
  • Follow the directions – Agents put directions in the MLS for a reason. Day Sleepers, alarm codes, pet’s directions or you may need to call the agent before showing. Don’t get off on the wrong foot with the listing agent by not following the directions in the MLS.

As you can see the Home Buyer Viewing Code of Etiquette is as much for the Realtors as it is for the Buyers. The Bigelow Group Realtors at Coldwell Banker Select try to follow this Etiquette do you?

Jim Bigelow Broker Associate

918-640-4657

Jim@jimbigelow.com

www.jimbigelow.com

The Bigelow Group

Coldwell Banker Select

Tulsa, OK.